Tag Archives: 20s

A Bookish Love Story

T+E

T+E

5 years ago, I met this guy. I had just gotten out of a semi-serious and seriously burdensome long-distance relationship. I had just transferred to a new school in a new city in which I knew exactly one person. I was almost 20, and I had no intention of doing anything less than what my mom would call “dating around.”

And then, mere weeks after I move to Nashville, I meet this guy. And he is interesting and uncomplicated, and he’s flirting with me. Our first spark is a mutual obsession with The Lord of the Rings. He’s tall and good-looking, and now he’s wearing glasses and sipping whiskey and talking about Tolkien? How can I not?

As I get to know him over the cold months of 2008, I learn he’s the storyteller among his friends, who all love him fiercely, and that he also happens to be an extremely talented musician. I begin to fall.

Spring comes, and we are together. The world goes a little hazy, falls away. We are sharing our lives – our friends, our passions, our secrets, our time. And we read to each other. We do many things together, but he reads books that I have read, and I am in love.

Years pass. We share many, many highs and quite a few lows too; we are together under every sky, through every season. Then one winter day almost a year ago, he gets down on one knee and puts a ring on my finger – a Jazz Age antique. It is clearer than ever that we are meant to be.

We plan a wedding, but not just any wedding… our wedding. It must have music and books, scotch and flapper dresses. It is perfect. And then, life.

Today, Tyler and I celebrate five years together. I haven’t posted any wedding/honeymoon photos yet, so I thought it was an appropriate day to start. Below are some of the bookish details featured in our wedding…

one of our engagement shots

an engagement shot

the last line says, "20s inspired attire"

the last line: “20s inspired attire”

songs from the Downton Abbey, Finding Neverland, Pride and Prejudice, and Fellowship of the Ring soundtracks

songs from the Downton Abbey, Finding Neverland, Pride and Prejudice, and Fellowship of the Ring soundtracks; readings from E.E. Cummings and Shakespeare

designed by incredible bridesmaid/graphic designer Candie Walter as a wedding gift

poster by incredible bridesmaid/graphic designer Candie Walter

Tolkien quote on the favor cards

Tolkien quote on the favor cards

typewriter guestbook

typewriter guestbook

rings stored in a Fellowship of the Ring book safe

rings stored in a Fellowship of the Ring book safe

Lord of the Rings book cake

Lord of the Rings book cake

books on every table

books on every table

cameras, hourglasses, pearls, teacups, wine bottles, book ends, too

cameras, hourglasses, pearls, teacups, wine bottles, book ends, too

pinwheels from pages of Pride and Prejudice for every vase

pinwheels from pages of Pride and Prejudice for every vase

decorative paper pinwheel display

decorative paper pinwheel display

pinwheel display on the mantel

pinwheels on the mantel

dictionary page, eucalyptus, and lace boutonnieres

dictionary page, eucalyptus, and lace boutonnieres

paper bouquets

paper bouquets

many paper bouquets

many paper bouquets

sheet music paper bouquet

sheet music

flapper bridesmaids

flapper bridesmaids

book page and peacock feather fascinator

book page and peacock feather fascinator

earrings featuring quotes from A Midsummer Night's Dream

earrings featuring quotes from A Midsummer Night’s Dream

killer wedding party

killer wedding party

Paper crafts by the bridesmaids and me.
Photos by the lovely Liz Hendrickson.
Paper goods by the fabulous Holley Maher.
Cake by Stephanie Felts of The Sweetest Day.
Flowers by Vicki Sanders of Branching Out.
Hair and makeup by Kelly Hamilton of Imagine Design Team.
Dress by Casablanca Bridal, from The White Room, Lebanon, TN.
Location: Hermitage Golf Course, Old Hickory, TN.

Lovers and Other Strangers

My absolute favorite artist in the world is Jack Vettriano, which may seem a little cliche due to a few extremely well known and well exploited works of his.  However, I feel unique in saying so because I’ve studied his work, I know his background, I can recognize his distinctive style from a mile away.  I’ve no less than seven prints by Vettriano on display in my apartment (and about fifty more that I wish I had wall space for), not to mention the coffee table book on my, well, coffee table.  The Singing Butler is probably his most famous work, which was interestingly enough part of his first London exhibition back in October 1992 called God’s Children:

you know

Vettriano was born in Fife, Scotland in 1951.  He sparked an interest in painting when a girlfriend gave him a set of watercolors on his 21st birthday, and spent the next nearly 20 years teaching himself how to paint.

In 1989, he submitted two paintings to the Royal Scottish Academy’s annual exhibition; both were accepted and sold on the first day. The following year, an equally enthusiastic reaction greeted the three paintings, which he entered for the prestigious Summer Exhibition at London’s Royal Academy and his new life as an artist began from that point on.

The next twenty years produced over 23 separate exhibitions, including those during his 13-year residence at London’s Portland Gallery, which produced such projects as The Passion and the Pain; Between Darkness and Dawn; Lovers and Other Strangers; Affairs of the Heart; and Love, Devotion, and Surrender.

this makes me think of November (probably because it was the featured piece on a calendar I had once)

I have a deep appreciation for Vettriano’s work mostly due his fascination with stylized 20s- and 30s-type settings and characters.  I also love his use of rich, warm colors for his light, sentimental work, and cooler, occasionally faded colors for his darker, moodier pieces.  Vettriano devotes his efforts to exploring specifically angles of the human body and how changing postures and profiles can portray emotion or circumstance, and more broadly, human interactions in general – half of his works feature two or more people and the other half seems to be clearly contemplating those not shown.

The thought and lyricism in the titles of his works is another effort that rings especially important to me (as a writer and general lover of language).  The piece above is called Back Where You Belong.  The piece below is Elegy for a Dead Admiral.

one of my definite favs

I find his work to convey both timelessness and elegance, his collection as a whole striking a delicate balance between the ethereal and the esoteric.  The pieces both above and below are hanging in my dining room.

The next few pieces are Mad Dogs, The Temptress, Waltzers, and Sweet Bird of Youth, respectively.

a fairly early work

a fairly recent work

might recognize this one too

the first piece I ever saw

A few other well recognized paintings are Bad Boy, Good Girl (1994), In Thoughts of You (1996), Dance Me to the End of Love (1998), and Cafe Days (1995).  Below is Vettriano, now 58:

the artist